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DIRTY CELLO CUTS LOOSE - MONTEREY COUNTY WEEKLY

October 2019 by Paul Fried

Dirty Cello has all kinds of connotations, some even provocative. But cellist Rebecca Roudman didn’t intend any of that.

“When I play classical cello I think of it as such a clean way to play the instrument,” she says. “I was going for the opposite.”

FOLLOWING DANCING BOOT TRACKS - TAHOE ON STAGE

August 2019 by Tim Parsons

When Rebecca Roudman started the band Dirty Cello, she didn’t think it would go anywhere. Instead, it’s gone everywhere.

In seven years, Dirty Cello has released seven albums and had multiple tours in England, Italy and China.

TIME TO GET "DIRTY" - THE SHEET

July 2019 by Ted Carleton

Kicking off Thursday will be Dirty Cello, a band which performed on the Minaret Stage last year. 

DIRTY CELLO SHOWS OFF NEW ALBUM - MERCURY NEWS

May 2019 by Andrew Gilbert

When you take a cello out of concert halls and chamber settings and let it loose in a bar or nightclub, interesting things tend to happen.

BLUESY VIRTUOSOS - PACIFIC SUN

April 2019 by Charlie Swanson

Raised in San Rafael and now living in Novato, Rebecca Roudman makes her living as a cellist in the Oakland Symphony and the Santa Rosa Symphony. She started playing classical music when she was 7 years old, and after graduating as a music major in college, it was all classical music all the time.

DIRTY CELLO CLEANS UP BLUEGRASS SCENE - TIMES HERALD

Feb 2019 by Richard Freedman

First, it’s off to Israel. Then jump on a plane to the United Kingdom. And finish it with a jaunt to Iceland.

And you think you have a long commute to work?

DIRTY CELLO CD RELEASE PARTY - UPBEAT TIMES

Jan 2019 by Shekeyna Black

Question: What does an electic bluegrass fusion band and a renowned orchestra have in common? Answer: Rebecca Roudman plays cello for both. Roudman, the versatile bandleader for Dirty Cello, has been performing with the prestigious Santa Rosa Symphony since 2001.

DIRTY CELLO RETURNS TO BLUE NOTE - NAPA VALLEY REGISTER

Oct, 2018 by David Kerns

Cellist Rebecca Roudman leads a musical double life. While she is a serious symphonic cellist with experience in a number of Bay Area orchestras, her first love is Dirty Cello, her multi-genre quartet. They return to Blue Note Napa for two shows this Friday evening, Oct. 5.

MUSICIANS NEAR AND FAR TO ROCK OUT - REDDING RECORD

Aug, 2018 by Jessica Skropanic

Music artists who made Redding a regular stop on their tours are joining with a few new faces to rock out — and folk out, and blues out — for those most affected by the Carr Fire. They'll play an eclectic benefit concert when they gather on Aug. 31 at the Cascade Theatre in Redding.

CELLO THEFT SOLVED WITH CONCERTED EFFORT - J WEEKLY

Nov, 2018 by Laura Paull

The two co-founders of the local bands Dirty Cello and San Francisco Yiddish Combo were robbed of their musical instruments in San Francisco Tuesday night, but a strong community effort and the ingenious play of a Good Samaritan helped recover the valuable cello and guitar about 15 hours after they went missing.

DIRTY CELLO HITS THE BRICKS AT OSF - ASHLAND TIDINGS

July, 2018 by Nick Diamantides

When lead guitar is replaced by the sound of hot licks on a cello, blues, rock and bluegrass rise to a new dimension. Dirty Cello — a four-piece band from San Francisco — makes its style of string music to inspire audiences to swing, sway and dance.

“Our music has never been described as calming,” cellist Rebecca Roudman says with a laugh. “We love the idea of having people unplug, rock out at our concerts and be happy.”

ANYTHING BUT CLASSICAL - ROGUE VALLEY MESSENGER

July, 2018 by Sara Jane Wiltermood

Crooning into the mic about the injustices of the labels placed on females while rocking out a bluesy riff on the cello is not something you see every day. Dirty Cello strives to be that unique group that turns heads and shatters stereotypes, all centered around that stalwart instrument of any orchestra or symphony—the cello. Lead singer and cellist Rebecca Roudman fills us in on what it takes to break the mold.

KLEZMER FOR THE 21ST CENTURY - J WEEKLY

July, 2018 by Laura Paull

For North Bay musicians Rebecca Roudman and Jason Eckl, who have traveled the world with their band Dirty Cello, creating yet another band was just an extension of their boundless musical interests, from jazz to pop to classical.

"ELOGIO DEL VIOLONCELLO"- LA TUA REPUBBLICA

MAY, 2018 

Il Museo archeologico nazionale di Napoli è anche "Un museo che suona". Per quattro giorni, dal 31 maggio al 3 giugno, con "Elogio del violoncello", il Mann diretto da Paolo Giulierini si trasformerà in un'immensa scatola sonora grazie alle suggestioni di un originale format musicale firmato da Stefano Valanzuolo.

GETTING GRITTY WITH DIRTY CELLO - SF CLASSICAL VOICE

MAY, 2018 by Lou Fancher

On YouTube, you can view not one, but three side-by-side-by-side Rebecca Roudmans simultaneously rocking through Purple Haze on three cellos — a 1909 French classic, a gray carbon-fiber model made by Luis and Clark, and an electric cello that resembles a funky hardwood board shaped like a smoothly beveled hourglass. 

GOOD OLD DAYS FOLLOW UP 60 YEARS - MONTEREY COUNTY NOW

APRIL, 2018 by Adam Joseph

At first glance, the core four bandmembers look like unassuming music students from Juilliard or Peabody. All preconceptions are overrun by prodigy Rebecca Roudman and a concept that involves her cello transforming into an electric guitar. 

DIFFERENT BEAT - WEST HAWAII TODAY

APRIL, 2018 by Elizabeth Pitts West

KAILUA-KONA — San Francisco-based musician Rebecca Roudman has been playing music since she was seven, when she was classically trained on the cello.

What started as a hobby she learned just for fun has turned into a career touring the world with her band, Dirty Cello, and performing something very different from classical music.

DIRTY CELLO - HONOLULU STAR ADVERTISER

APRIL, 2018 by John Berger

The cello has had an honored place in Western classical music for several hundred years, but who thinks of it as a cool pop instrument? Compare the cello to the acoustic bass — also known as the double bass, the contra-bass and the “stand-up bass” — which has epitomized “cool” ever since someone started playing it as a rhythm instrument around the 1920s.

GREAT MUSICIANS FIND THEIR INSPIRATION - PRESS DEMOCRAT

FEBRUARY, 2018 

Today’s classical musicians often express their creative talents in a variety of ways outside of more formal orchestral settings. Classical performers, such as Rebecca Roudman, a cellist with the Santa Rosa Symphony, branch out into other musical genres, using their classical training, and often their classical instruments, to create a fresh and exciting sound such as that composed by Roudman’s band, ‘Dirty Cello.’ As a new generation of classical musicians, influenced by ever-increasing musical genres and styles, in turn, bring a new outlook and style to the music they perform.

BUT CAN A CELLO REALLY DO THAT? - CARMEL PINE CONE

JANUARY, 2018 by Chris Counts

REINVENTING AN instrument that is best known for its somber and melancholy sound, Dirty Cello visits the Henry Miller Library in Big Sur Saturday, Jan. 6. And if the weather cooperates, the band will even play outside under the redwoods — which will create quite a contrast to the frigid conditions most of the country is suffering through. The San Francisco-based ensemble got its start in 2010 after cellist Rebecca Roudman, who had been experimenting with playing rock songs, won a local talent show, “Vallejo’s Got Talent.”

DIRTY CELLO DUO BOOKED AT JFK LIBRARY - VALLEJO TIMES-HERALD

JANUARY, 2018 by Richard Freedman

Weed is a lumber town in Siskyou County with a population hanging around 3,000 residents.

Somewhat whimsically, Rebecca Roudman emailed the management of The Weed Palace. And, wouldn’t you know it, that’s where the quartet plays this weekend.

“I never heard of The Weed Palace Theater. I never heard of Weed, California,” Roudman said. “There are so many small cities that I never heard of. It seems a little bit out there. Maybe they will all come to the show.”

DIRTY CELLO GOES GRIMY - MONTEREY COUNTY WEEKLY

JANUARY, 2018 by Paul Fried

In choosing a band name that conjures all kinds of possibilities, Dirty Cello bandleader Rebecca Roudman feels the decision was simple.

“I like classical, but it’s not my favorite music,” she says. “And I love blues, and I love bluegrass. I have eclectic musical tastes, and over time I began to wonder if it would be possible to do the cello as a lead instrument, like the guitar is in a rock band.”

She then adds this: “When I play classical I think of it as such a clean way to play. I was going for the opposite of that.”

DIRTY CELLO: OFF THE RECORD

July, 2017 by Jade Shojaee

 

As a professional musician, I think people have a weird misconception about the idea of “making it.” I started out by going to college for music. It was there I got a lot of training and worked on the idea that to make it as a professional musician in the modern world, one of the keys is being a diverse player.  At one point in time, my career consisted of orchestras all over California, session work with everyone from blues musicians to 20th century post-modern avante-garde music to teaching private lessons.

MUSIC PREVIEW - LA TIMES

July, 2016 by Erik Himmelsbach-Weinstein

Rebecca Roudman has a complicated relationship with the cello. Classically trained from childhood, she performs with two Bay Area symphonies. But all things being equal, she'd rather just shred.

"I've never been a huge fan of classical music," she says from Berlin, where her band, Dirty Cello, is on an eight-city tour of Europe. (They perform at Coffee Gallery Backstage in Altadena on Aug. 12). "Polite applause is great, but in-your-face cheering is so much better."

DIRTY CELLO - CONTENT MAGAZINE

JULY, 2016 by Nick Panoutsos

 

Every year, the San Jose Jazz Summer Fest pushes musical boundaries by booking diverse acts that break the mold of what listeners know as jazz music. The 2016 lineup is no exception. Soul, blues, and hip-hop artists add variety to a lengthy list of jazz heavyweights and rising stars. In spite of the seemingly vast genre gap between some of the artists, the San Francisco Bay Area’s own Dirty Cello is proof that all performers at the Summer Fest share a common respect for the jazz tradition.

CELLO MIT BESONDERER NOTE

July, 2016

Musiker aus San Francisco begeisterten bei Konzert im Hof der Kulturscheune.

DELANCEY STREET FOUNDATION WELCOMES DIRTY CELLO

July, 2016 by Carrie Sownie

Rebecca Roudman and Jason Eckl of Dirty Cello have been volunteering since 2015 and are already dedicated Bread & Roses Presents performers. Novato-based and internationally renowned, Dirty Cello is known for their energetic mix of bluegrass, blues and classic rock. They have played with artists such as Santana, Joan Baez and Deltron 3030, and they performed their first show in June at The Delancey Street Foundation in San Francisco.

DIRTY CELLO ON THE ROAD - STRINGS MAGAZINE

February, 2016 by Rebecca Roudman

I got married last summer and, when planning for the wedding, there was no question about where I wanted to spend my honeymoon—Italy! Since my new husband [Dirty Cello guitarist Jason Eckl] and I are both in the band, we thought it would be a fun idea to combine our honeymoon with a performance tour.

WHIRLWIND TOUR DIARY - STRINGS MAGAZINE

January, 2015 by Rebecca Roudman

After 32 hours, I was in China! We had gotten up in the wee hours of the morning (at 4 am) and arrived an hour later at San Francisco International Airport.

Who knew we were actually too early to get checked in? (Wish I had slept 20 more minutes.) The band boarded the plane and after a crazy flight path that veered from San Francisco to Vancouver, Vancouver to Beijing, and Beijing to the Chinese city of Dalian, finally arrived.

IT'S DIRTY WORK - STRINGS MAGAZINE

January, 2014 by David Templeton

A weather-beaten man is listening to Rebecca Roudman, as she plays Jimi Hendrix' "Purple Haze" on the cello. "Awesome!" the aged gentleman murmurs, the moment he recognizes the familiar melody. Clearly a man of the streets, he is seated in the lobby of the Hotel Cadillac in San Francisco's seedy Tenderloin District.

He's a guest at the hotel's weekly Concerts at the Cadillac series, staging free performances of classical, jazz, and world music for residents of the low-income residential hotel.

DIRTY CELLO AT DON QUIXOTE'S - GOOD TIMES, SANTA CRUZ

June, 2016 by Cat Johnson

Rebecca Roudman stands front and center in an automotive garage currently serving as a makeshift video set. The classically trained cellist rests her bow on the instrument’s strings, leans forward, plays a few long mournful notes, then breaks into a rousing, sassy rendition of the Robert Johnson classic tune, “Cross Road Blues.”

Though the gap between the rough garage setting and the polished cello sound is wide, it’s not entirely unexpected for Roudman and her band Dirty Cello. A Bay Area outfit that tosses aside musical convention, Dirty Cello keeps its repertoire, sound, and venues unpredictable, performing in flashmobs, marathons and a cave.

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE - VALLEJO TIMES-HERALD

April, 2015 by Richard Freeman

It was, perhaps, not a big move. Not like, say, California to Iowa. But even a cross-town change-of-address in Novato can be a bit stressful.

e in Vallejo on Saturday.

INTUITION

2013 Book by C.J. Omololu

  “An electric cello. Pretty cool, huh?”
    He nods quickly. “It was almost like it was singing the words.”
    “Exactly. When you can’t sing, the instrument can do it for you.”
    “Can you teach me to play stuff like that?”
    “Yep. We’ll start out easy and then get to the hard stuff as you get better. Rebecca’s even from San Francisco, so maybe we can all go to one of her shows sometime.”
    “That would be cool,” he agrees.
    The look on his face almost makes me want to reach out and hug him, but something about Zander tells me he’s not the hugging type.

CELLO, REIMAGINED - MARIN MAGAZINE

April, 2016 by Kasia Pawlowska

There's a good chance you’ve already heard Rebecca Roudman play. She performed on the soundtracks for the Bruce Willis film Looper and the Jeremy Renner film Kill the Messenger. On top of that, her band Dirty Cello has been making its mark on the Bay Area with more than 100 shows a year. Dirty Cello’s most recent release Beach House Sessions was recorded in an idyllic house at Muir Beach, where the band stayed until they finished an album full of classic American blues and bluegrass cover songs.

CSUEB MUSIC GRAD POPULARIZES "ROCK CELLO" - CSUEB MAGAZINE

April, 2013

When Cal State East Bay music graduate Rebecca Roudman ’99, pulled the bow across her cello and played the Scorpions’ “Rock You Like a Hurricane,”  at a local competition, the audience went wild.

Right then, the term “rock cello” came to her mind and eventually led to the creation of her current musical group, “Dirty Cello”.

“We were brainstorming for a name for our group and thought, ’What is the opposite of playing cleanly on the cello - or playing classically on the cello?’ I came up with Dirty Cello,” Roudman said. “We instantly loved the name. Dirty Cello to us means ‘wild and rockin’.”

THE EAST BAY OAKLAND SYMPHONY - OAKLAND MAGAZINE

April 2015 by Lou Fancher

Arguably, Roudman epitomizes the revolutionary spirit of the trio—and of the current that runs sub-surface in OEBS’s culture and programming. She and guitarist Jason Eckl co-founded Dirty Cello, a San Francisco-based band that started off playing blues, then added bluegrass, gypsy, jazz, and folk music while retaining a firm grip on classical foundations.

SAN SEVERINO BLUES: DIRTY CELLO

August, 2015

È l’evento più particolare del Festival: un concerto itinerante della stessa band diviso in 2 set, uno completamente acustico alle 17.00 nel bosco di faggi secolari di Canfaito nel territorio di San Severino, l’altro elettrico alle 21.30 sulla piazza di Apiro, per ascoltare il violoncello come non l’avete mai sentito e il virtuosismo di Rebecca Roudman, tra le violoncelliste crossover più strepitose della Baia di San Francisco. 

BRAVISSIMI DIRTY CELLO IN PIAZZA DELLA BADIA

July, 2015

Piazza della Chiesa a Vaiano era completamente invasa da persone provenienti da varie parti della provincia ed anche della Toscana, per assistere al concerto dei “Dirty Cello”, formazione statunitense (californiana) ai suoi primi esordi in Italia. Un concerto molto ritmato, composto da elementi blues, musica dance dell’Europa dell’Est, bluegrass e rock classico.  Un concentrato di “folle” energia che ha come protagonista il violoncello, sfruttato al massimo e nel modo più magico e spettacolare.

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